Posts Tagged With: baby animal battle

101: Regret the Puppy

“Here we are,” Chandra said as the two women spilled out of the pickup truck that had given them a lift from Mutanda junction.  Their bags tumbled out on top of them.  When the truck door was shut the drive gave a slight nod of his head and pulled away.

“Where are we going?” Chelsi asked filling her arms with reusable grocery bags while trying to balance a box of strawberry plants on her head.

“The path way there by the red sign,” Chandra gestured to pathway on the other side of the tarmac road. The two women waddled across the road under their burdens, towards a neatly swept compound of houses.  About half way up the path a yellow puppy with an excited tail came bounding up to them.  “Oh, Regret, hi how are you?  This is my host brother’s puppy Regret.”

“Oh he’s so cute, he reminds me of Daisy when she was this size.  Just so excited about everything! Aren’t you so excited!” Chelsi cooed to the puppy. “Alright, which house is yours?” she asked starting to feel the weight of the bags in her arms.

“There, that one,” Chandra nodded to a tall house with a thick thatch roof that swooped down over the door, nestled between a standalone storage room and a long laundry line.  They closed the last few meters and Chandra balanced the box she was carrying as she fumbled for her keys.  She slipped the key into the lock, twisted it open and pulled back the bolt.  The door swung open, they stumbled in, opening their arms onto the floor. “Welcome to my home,” Chandra smiled. “Everything is kind of anywhere because I haven’t had the time to make any furniture yet.”  A rainbow of plastic basins was stacked in the far corner.  A myriad of kitchen utensils, pots, pans and mixing bowls were piled around a couple of large black food bins.  Prominently placed in the moderately sized sitting room was a familiar looking futon.

“Where the hell did you get a futon?” Chelsi asked, bewildered, trying to take in her surroundings.

“No, Regret, you stay outside,” she scolded the little puppy, who connected his backend with her door mat. “What do you mean? It’s the futon from the Prov house. We got that new couch from Molly, so Laura said I can have this one.  Haven’t you noticed it’s been missing from the house for like, eight months?” Chandra laughed.

Chelsi and Chandra went about unpacking and organizing their things.  Chelsi only had with her a day pack, the pack she a taken with her when she left Jeremy alone in her house for site visit.  This was the last day of site visit, and Chelsi could have gone home that afternoon.  But I have what? 10 days left in the Kamijiji house?  What difference is a couple of days going to make?  So she decided to go home with her friend Chandra, a health volunteer whose house was another 50 km down the turn off to Chelsi’s house

The rest of the evening passed relatively uneventfully.  When they finished unpacking Chandra introduced Chelsi to her host family.  Her sisters welcomed Chelsi warmly, with hugs and smiles. All the while Regret the puppy was tow, wiggling his body and lapping excitedly at his nose.  Chandra’s host family scolded him when he got too close to the cooking pots, but otherwise treated him gently.

After a dinner of rice and vegetable the two women tucked themselves into bed.

The next morning Chandra started the brazier and Chelsi cooked the eggs.  When their plates were clean Chandra went off to greet her family for the day, let them know about the programs she had going on for the day.  Chelsi hung back to finish washing the dishes from the night before.  When Chandra returned her face was painted with distress. “My host parents said that Regret got hit by a car this morning over by the borehole.  He went with my host sisters to fetch water this morning, and a car that had pulled of the tarmac clipped his back end.”

“Is he okay? Well I mean, obviously not,” Chelsi started to stand up.

“He’s over there, curled up in the bush with my host brother.  They asked if we had any medicine for him.” She hesitated, “I don’t know what to do.”

“Well, let’s go have a look,” Chelsi was nervous that the injury would be gruesome, but walked over to the bushes where the boys were standing around.  They watched as she approached.  One of the smaller boys was making an attempt to catch the puppy, who Chelsi faintly see between the brush was limping about. Well he’s walking for now, so that’s good. 

By the time Chelsi and Chandra closed the space between the house and the bushes the boy had chased the puppy up against a wall of brush.  He was curled up tightly in a ball.  The rear foot on top was starting to swell rapidly.  “Oh baby boy, who’s such a brave puppy,” Chelsi used the voice she used to calm Daisy whenever she needed a shot.  “Are you being such a good a boy,” she continued crouching down. The boys both backed away and leaned closer.  “I know it hurts, but you’re being so brave,” She lifted the top leg gently see the other one.

Where skin had been torn away, dirt, sticks and leave were stuck to exposed muscle. There was a limited about a bleeding around the ends of the torn skin, and this paw wasn’t swelling as fast.  It could have been a lot worse.  “Alright baby boy, let’s get you cleaned up.” Chelsi scooped Regret up gently, cradling him against her chest.

“How is he?” Chandra, who was still standing closer to the house, asked.

“It not as bad as it could have been.  He really needs some stitches and a split, but do you have some gauze, ace bandages, antibiotic cream, some alcohol pads.” Chelsi adjusted her arms around Regret and kneeled to pick up Chandra’s welcome mat.  She crossed the few meters between Chandra’s front door and her chinzanza, shook out the mat and laid the puppy down on top of it. “There you go baby boy,”  He made a lame attempt to stand up and move away but kept him down by scratching behind his ears and placing a kiss on the end of his nose.

Chandra came out of her house with the supplies Chelsi asked for.  She placed them down beside the puppy in the chinzanza. “Iiii, that doesn’t look good.  That kind of stuff really grosses me out.”

Chelsi start picking the large debris out of Regret’s wounds.  She talked to him gently all the while and he eventually let his head rest on the mat, resigned to his fate of being helped.  As she worked, the pile of debris, alcohol pads and gauze wrappers grew high before Chelsi was satisfied with her work.  She finished by securing the gauze with the ace bandage and stroked Regret’s neck.  She would have liked to wrap the other paw to help control the swelling, but there was only one bandage and keeping the open wounds clean was more important she decided.   “Alright baby boy, you’re all set. Tomorrow I’ll change your bandages again.  Now don’t play to rough on it.” She smiled and the puppy looked up as she backed away.  “I’ll ask Chandra for some water for you.”

“How is he?” Chandra asked hearing her name.

“Time will tell.”

Advertisements
Categories: Action, DIY, Drama, Health & Fitness, Horror | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

072: Colosseum

Chelsi’s champion strode out on to the front porch of her house.  The tuxedo colored kitten was a mere seven weeks, but confident in his stride.  Upon his appearance small group of village boys, Giddie, Willie, and Kingston, let out a squeal from their seat on the bench.

Look, look!” Willie said to the others.  “Ka ka push.”  All their eyes widened, like it was the first cat they’d ever seen.  Chelsi watched them from her seat at the edge of the porch.  She was sure their gleeful nature wasn’t false, but this was far from their first interaction with a cat.  After all, this is my fourth cat, Chelsi thought to herself, regretfully remembering the demise of the previous three.  And I know Mike had at least two cats at some point during his service.

“Jizhina?” Giddie asked, fixing his round, dark eyes on Chelsi.

“Ka ka push? Ka Tulip.”

“Tulip, Tulip, Tulip,” the three boy practiced between themselves.  Tulip paused to clean one of his paws, and Chelsi wiggled her fingers at him to get his attention.

“Giddie, Giddie!” Kingston exclaimed, grabbing the attention of his friend.  “Those small animals we found today, where are they?”  Giddie’s face beamed with a smile and he leaned forward, tugging on the string of his toy truck.  The truck, made of discarded plastic and wire, rolled towards him on its bottle top wheels.  A really engineer that one could be someday, it was clear to Chelsi that Giddie was the best toy car maker in all the village, and every day nearly he was pulling about a new style.  When the truck’s rolling came to a stop, Giddie gingerly picked it up and from the back compartment plucked up toy baby dormice.

“Crickee,” Chelsi said with some surprise, “it’s even got passengers today. Mwatanna pi?”  Chelsi didn’t fully understand the answer, but gathered that he found the nest out in the bush by his house.  She continued to watch with great interest as to what the boys had in mind next.  When just then Giddie dropped the two round, fuzzy grey bodies on to the cement and nudged them towards Chelsi’s kitten.

The baby dormice were too young to make any meaningful get away.  One wiggled its undersized legs, pushing itself on its belly to the corner by Chelsi’s door.  Its litter mate squeaked.  The less intelligent move, Chelsi noted as Tulip’s ear perked up in its direction.

To some surprise, Chelsi was not immediately overcome with moral outrage at the activities that were unfolding before her.  First, not that the infant mice were disturbed from their nest, nor that they had then been pulled around by a child in a toy truck all day, and not now, seeing that the boys intention were to watch this baby on baby animal battle, hoping no doubt for it to end in the bloody demise of the dormice.

Tulip started towards his first contender.  When the kitten pressed his nose in the plump body of the mouse it let out low chirt chirt chirt sound.  Tulip, surprised, recoiled.

What could I say that the boys would understand…? Not much, she decided.  She knew the children went in to the bush on necessity, looking for food and that mice, particularly dormice, were not off the menu.  Not to mention mice, particularly dormice, are a grievous house pest. Better food for the kitten.

Tulip had revised his approach to the protesting dormouse and was now slapping it with his paw.  With every slap, the baby dormouse let out a squeak, chirt chirt chirt.

The boys were pointing with interest, discussing the play by play amongst themselves.  And as Giddie had noticed the second baby dormouse trying to escape, he picked it up and deposited it in to his chest pocket.

I do want the kitten to learn to eat mice, Chelsi reasoned with herself, putting the best spin on the current circumstance that she could.  That why I keep trying to keep cats.  The truth was, just one week without a cat and her house was overrun with mice and rats.  She thought about the last rat she saw, not a few days before, just after returning home with Tulip from Mwinilunga.  Chopping vegetables for dinner that night at the table, she heard a rustling in the thatch of her roof.  When she turned to see what it was, a giant rat was jumping out of the grass of her roof on to the top of her wall. She could still vividly recall the green glisten to its eyes.

Tulip continued batting the baby dormouse with his paw.  The few attempts he had made to lower his head the baby dormouse had bit him on the nose.

Tulip’s probably never really eaten anything live before.  This kitten had come from her friend Oliver’s house, about 30 km south of Mwinilunga.  At the time she had gone to see him and retrieve the kitten Oliver was caring for: two dogs, seven puppies, a cat, six kittens and a flock of improved laying chickens, though thankfully those were not also sharing his house.  But Oliver is a dutiful keeper and Chelsi was sure all of his animals had been plumped on its most appropriate animal feed. And with so much food about there would have been no need for Tulip’s mother to hunt.

When there was the sound of soft bones being crushed, one of the boys let out a gasp breaking up Chelsi’s train of thought.  She reigned in thousand mile stare, and focused on her kitten.  Tulip had finally mustered up his courage and had gone face first, mouth open, at the tiny fuzzy body.  Bright red blood began to bead-up on its grey fur.  With the last of its fight there was a furious chirt chirt chirt. 

It makes sense now, why animals are so attracted to squeaky toys.

Tulip pressed down with his paws and gnawed with his needle like teeth.  Shortly thereafter the incessant chirting ceased.

The boys, still perched on the bench giggled.  As the first mouse disappeared inside the kitten, Giddie revealed the second one.  The human beings attraction to blood sports can’t be denied, for even Chelsi had a hard time looking away now.

The second baby dormouse sat stock still, hoping not to be noticed.

Like two beasts in the colosseum.  Chelsi watched at Tulip followed his blood covered nose towards the second little dormouse.  Or more like the lion and a Christian martyr. 

Categories: Action, Horror, Thriller | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.